Amuda (Amûdê / Amouda)

Amuda (Arabic: عامودا‎, translit. ‘Āmūdā, Kurdish: Amûdê‎, Classical Syriac: ܥܐܡܘܕܐ‎) is a small city in the Qamişlo Canton, in the Jazira Region of the Democratic Federation of Northern Syria.

Amuda lies close to the border with Turkey.

 

The Autonomous Administration of North and East Syria is taking measures to contain the economic crisis

Qamishlo residents expressed their satisfaction with the measures of the Autonomous Administration with regard to the living reality, which is considered a temporary remedy to contain the economic crisis in the regions of northeast of Syria. The economist Aladdin Farhan described these measures as "positive", indicating that these steps will be a success by studying them more deeply.

Co-operatives Strengthen Women in Rojava

The Kurdish umbrella organisation Kongreya Star supports various cooperatives in Rojava in which women work autonomously and thus stand up for themselves and the community at the same time. There are now 16 new cooperatives in Cizîrê despite the war.

Are the fires a war against Rojava’s economy?

ISIS was defeated in the military arena, but now the Northern and Eastern Syrian Federation is fighting against fires. With the start of the harvest season, suspicious fires have destroyed decares of cultivated lands.

Agriculture & Autonomy in the Middle East

In the predominantly Kurdish regions of Syria and Turkey, known respectively as Rojava and North Kurdistan, a groundbreaking experiment in communal living, social justice, and ecological vitality is taking place. Devastated by civil war, the Middle East is often seen as a place where little more than a cessation of hostilities can be hoped for. But Rojava and North Kurdistan have set their sights much higher. What started as a movement for political autonomy has blossomed into an attempt to build a radical pluralist democracy on the principles of communal solidarity — with food security, equality for women, and a localized, anti-capitalist economy at its core.

Thoughts on Rojava: an interview with Janet Biehl

Do I think this system in Rojava is purely as Bookchin envisioned it? Not purely, but perhaps that may lie beyond the abilities of real human beings. But the people are wrestling with problems of implementation that Bookchin, as a theorist, never foresaw, and I think that even the mistakes that people in Rojava might make are relevant to the future importance of these ideas.