Mala Jin: Empowering women and strengthening society

The Women’s Revolution in Rojava has for more than 10 years brought forward women in Northern and Eastern Syria who dedicate their lives to helping and supporting women in their daily lives in the face of all forms of hardship and threat. Mala Jin is one of these organizations that not only helps and supports them, but also actively works for women and society to live freely. This booklet, prepared by Kongra Star, is intended to provide a better insight into Mala Jin and to recognize the work and commitment of these women.

After Ten Years of Developing the Science of Women: My Feelings about Jineolojî

Jineolojî, which we define as the science of women, life, society and as meaning, has been trying to intervene in the field of social sciences for more than a decade.

“Women must defend women!”

Women Defend Rojava interviewed Naima Mehmud, co-chair of the Mala Jin (Women’s House) in the canton of Heseke. They talked with her about the work of Mala Jin and how it is influenced by the current Turkish state’s invasion and war and the recent Covid-19 pandemic.

Dismantling “Power” by building “Democratic Autonomy”

In a time of deep despair, human and ecological crisis, the example of Democratic Autonomy in Rojava has created hope, and given new inspiration to people in Syria and the Middle East. In fact, a lot of people in other parts of the world have become a part of this process and are connecting it to the struggles in their own regions. Despite all the shortcomings and numerous obstacles during the last decade, we have learned that the democratic confederal organization of society can fulfill many spiritual and material needs of society. We have learned that democratic transformation is a continuing process, which requires constant societal and self-reflection. Our achievements are not assured forever, if we do not protect and advance them.

An Overview of AANES Women’s Institutions in Manbij

The case of Manbij, liberated from ISIS by the SDF in August 2016, shows how women in a multi-ethnic Syrian city used AANES [the Autonomous Administration of North and East Syria] frameworks to build institutions, take on leadership roles, and organize in their communities to change discriminatory attitudes.