Serekaniye (Serê Kaniyê / Ras al-Ayn)

Serekaniye appears on maps officially as Ras al-Ayn (Arabic: رأس العين‎, translit. Raʾs al-ʿAyn, Turkish: Resülayn, Kurdish: Serê Kaniyê‎, Classical Syriac: ܪܝܫ ܥܝܢܐ‎, translit. Rēš Aynā).

Serekaniye is a city in the Al-Hasakah Canton, in the Jazira Region of the Democratic Federation of Northern Syria. It lies on the border with Turkey.

One of the oldest civilisations in Upper Mesopotamia, the area has been inhabited since at least the Neolithic age (c. 8,000 BC). It has been Aramean, Roman, and Byzantine.

In 1921, the city was divided by the drawing of new borders that separated the new nation states of Turkey and Syria. Its northern part lies in Turkey and is officially called Ceylanpınar.

In 2005, Serekaniye was recorded as having a population of 29,347 Arabs, Kurds, Syriac, and a smaller number of Armenians and Chechens.

They Contributed to their Communities by Forming a Co-operative

Eleven women have successfully formed a co-operative society by buying a power generator. These women were previously stripped from their natural right to work and were distanced from contributing to the communal economy, but thanks to the Rojava Revolution they have reinforced the women's economy and reinstated a role for women in their society.

Improving Rojava’s Economy: forming co-operatives in Serekaniye

“The co-operative societies in Serekaniye are based on social, co-operative and communal principles. They are not established only to make profits, and for that reason the administrators of the co-operative societies form meetings and seminars with the participants in the villages and cities, in order to raise awareness and introduce the ideas of co-operatives to the people. It is important to rely on small businesses and encourage participation in co-ops. The organisers in those meetings and seminars also get a chance to listen to the complaints and the needs of the people.”

Co-operatives Play a Major Role in Northern Syria

After the Democratic Autonomous Administration was able to establish a democratic way of life in Northern Syria, they introduced the socio-economic model of co-operative societies. As the revolution has developed, people have begun to form co-operatives. Hundreds of co-operatives are now operating in the area. One of the areas where many co-operatives have spread is in Serêkaniyê city, where residents began forming co-operatives in 2014.

In Northern Syria, the Neolithic Period Comes to Light

In northern Syria, Til Xelef, Girê Moza and Til Beyder are home to more than 2,000 Neolithic sites. The self-government in northern Syria restored the destroyed artefacts and put them under protection.

The Rojava Revolution: The Revolution of Economic Achievements and Return to Communal Economy

After the announcement of the Democratic Self Administration in 2014, institutions were organised and local councils and committees were formed which concentrated their efforts on the economic situation in the region. One of the missions of the Economic Committee was to support the agricultural, industrial and commercial projects throughout Rojava, with the aim of reaching self-sufficiency, curbing monopoly and exploitation, reducing unemployment and activating the work force, both male and female.

The Advance of Women’s Economic Projects and Co-operatives in Rojava’s Cizire Canton in 2016

The year 2016 was characterised by the advance of economic projects that aimed to improve the communal economy in Rojava, especially the projects that were connected to women.
Rojava, Syria, Kurdistan, communes, cooperatives, coops

Co-operatives and Communes: the third way of Rojava in the Syrian conflict

A journey into the heart of the revolution and the strategies of transition towards a social economy: the multiplication of communes and cooperatives, and experimentation with new models of social, political and economic organisation.
Syria, Rojava, Kurdistan, Kobanê, Kobanî, Kobani, Kobane, cooperative, women, coop, coops, Amarge

Women’s Co-operatives: a glimpse into Rojava’s economic model

In Rojava, the significance of the co-operative system lies in efforts to democratise all sectors of society, including the economy. For this reason, creating alternative means and avenues that allow traditionally marginalised groups such as women to actively participate and engage with the market is an essential aspect of the radical democratic model.