Hasankeyf

Hasankeyf (Kurmanji Kurdish: Heskîf, Arabic:حصن كيفا‎, Armenian: Հարսնքվ, Greek: Κιφας, Latin: Cepha, Syriac: ܟܐܦܐ‎) is a 12,000 year old city which is one of the oldest continuously inhabited settlements in the world. Much of the city and its archeological sites are at risk of being flooded with the completion of the Ilisu Dam.

Hasankeyf is rich in history throughout the ages and aside from the sites below, thousands of caves exist in the cliffs that surround the city. Many of the caves are multi-storied and have their own water supply. Churches and mosques were also carved into the cliffs and numerous ancient cemeteries exist throughout the area.

The current population of Hasankeyf is predominantly Kurdish. Until the 1980s, Assyrians/Syriacs and Arab Christian families lived in the cave houses by the river.

No more access to Hasankeyf

Access to the 12,000-year-old settlement of Hasankeyf is now only possible with a special permit. The cultural site in Northern Kurdistan is flooded by the Ilisu dam on the Tigris. With it a unique history is lost.

Last call for Hasankeyf as Ilisu Dam slowly engulfs it

Last call to try and stop the destruction of the 12,000 years old site.

Ilisu Dam Reservoir has reached Hasankeyf town – Apocalypse is Impending!

The filling of the controversial Ilisu Dam continues despite the ongoing strong critic and protests by the affected communities along the Tigris River and civil society organizations from all over Turkey. Almost two weeks ago the raising dam reservoir has reached the 12,000 years old town Hasankeyf which is one of the most magnificent cultural and natural heritage sites at our planet. The planned "apocalypse" by the Turkish government is becoming slowly reality!

Hasankeyf approaching doomsday

The Initiative to Keep Hasankeyf Alive has issued a statement saying that Hasankeyf and Tigris Valley are "approaching doomsday".

Turkey flooding Hasankeyf town with water

Turkey has started filling a huge hydroelectric dam on the Tigris River, a lawmaker and activists said, despite protests that it will displace thousands of people, the rising waters of the dam are also expected to eventually submerge the 12,000-year-old town of Hasankeyf.