Hasankeyf

Hasankeyf (Kurmanji Kurdish: Heskîf, Arabic:حصن كيفا‎, Armenian: Հարսնքվ, Greek: Κιφας, Latin: Cepha, Syriac: ܟܐܦܐ‎) is a 12,000 year old city which is one of the oldest continuously inhabited settlements in the world. Much of the city and its archeological sites are at risk of being flooded with the completion of the Ilisu Dam.

Hasankeyf is rich in history throughout the ages and aside from the sites below, thousands of caves exist in the cliffs that surround the city. Many of the caves are multi-storied and have their own water supply. Churches and mosques were also carved into the cliffs and numerous ancient cemeteries exist throughout the area.

The current population of Hasankeyf is predominantly Kurdish. Until the 1980s, Assyrians/Syriacs and Arab Christian families lived in the cave houses by the river.

Turkey flooding Hasankeyf town with water

Turkey has started filling a huge hydroelectric dam on the Tigris River, a lawmaker and activists said, despite protests that it will displace thousands of people, the rising waters of the dam are also expected to eventually submerge the 12,000-year-old town of Hasankeyf.

Stop the filling of the Ilisu Dam

Despite strong domestic and international opposition, the Turkish government has commenced filling the reservoir of the controversial Ilisu Dam on the Tigris River in the Kurdish Southeast of Turkey without giving any official warning to those still living in the area. Neither the state agency responsible for the dam, the State Hydraulic Works (DSI), nor

Globally 35 actions for Hasankeyf – Ilisu Dam filling postponed!

Just two days after the 3rd Global Days of Action for Hasankeyf, on 10th June 2019, the news spread that the filling of the Ilisu Dam reservoir has been postponed. The responsible state agency DSI (State Hydraulic Works) declared to several media agencies that due to high river flow at the Ilisu dam site and

International call to save Hasankeyf

Nearly 100 environmentalist institutions have called for action before the AKP-wanted Ilısu Dam makes ancient Hasankeyf disappearing. On 10 June some 12 thousand years of history will disappear under the waters of the Ilisu Dam.
Kurdistan, Bakur, Turkey, ecology, fire, forest fire

The Ecological Question: the Foundation of Democratic Confederalism

Of Democratic Confederalism’s three pillars—radical democracy, gender liberation, and ecological sustainability—I would argue that the latter is the most crucial, and sets the foundation for a truly democratic, inclusive and egalitarian society. A society cannot be democratic towards ethno-religious minorities or be truly gender progressive if it cannot first and foremost demonstrate an integral and profound respect for our shared land.