Jinwar Women’s Village

JINWAR Free Women’s Village is an ecological women’s village in the heart of Rojava. The village is ecological because it is built by hand using traditional building methods out of kerpiç – straw and mud that is baked in frames in the sun to make bricks. The construction of the women’s village started on March 10th, 2017, right after the 8th March international women’s day celebrations, and opened its doors to the residents and workers on November 25th, 2018, the international day against violence against women.

Women and their children live in the village – some have escaped from abusive families, others have been widowed in the war, and others are there only because they wish to live a communal life with other women. The village has 30 homes, a school, a bakery, a natural health centre, an academy, and a small shop. It has a communal economy based on ecological agriculture and all projects are run collectively. Every woman who settles in the village can participate in the village council and help plan the village life. Jinwar women can collectively bake their bread in the bakery or cook and eat in the communal kitchen. Men visit and help with work in the village, but only women and children live there, and only women are allowed on the council.

You can stay in touch with Jinwar via their Facebook page.

 

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