Jinwar Women’s Village

JINWAR Free Women’s Village is an ecological women’s village in the heart of Rojava. The village is ecological because it is built by hand using traditional building methods out of kerpiç – straw and mud that is baked in frames in the sun to make bricks. The construction of the women’s village started on March 10th, 2017, right after the 8th March international women’s day celebrations, and opened its doors to the residents and workers on November 25th, 2018, the international day against violence against women.

Women and their children live in the village – some have escaped from abusive families, others have been widowed in the war, and others are there only because they wish to live a communal life with other women. The village has 30 homes, a school, a bakery, a natural health centre, an academy, and a small shop. It has a communal economy based on ecological agriculture and all projects are run collectively. Every woman who settles in the village can participate in the village council and help plan the village life. Jinwar women can collectively bake their bread in the bakery or cook and eat in the communal kitchen. Men visit and help with work in the village, but only women and children live there, and only women are allowed on the council.

You can stay in touch with Jinwar via their Facebook page.

 

[Video] A perspective on the war from Jinwar women’s village (Part 1)

Rumet Heval, long time Jinwar resident and organiser, gave an interview to Women Defend Rojava from the village. In this first installment, she talks about the current situation, the relationship between science and imperialism, and the need to create a life based around collective women’s organising. The interview will continue…

Lessons for the UK from Rojava: political culture, ideology, democracy

I’m sending this message from the liberated territory of the Autonomous Administration of North East Syria, more commonly known as Rojava. I came here over half a year ago to join the work of the revolution and to learn from it. I’ve been doing ecological works – some tree planting and garden design, as well

Message from Jinwar Women’s Village in Rojava

Dear Friends of JINWAR! Thank you for you solidarity and support!We really feel all your voices and this has a big meaning for all of us.Situation in our country is really heavy. Turkish State is not stopping attack us, using the dirtiest methods of annihilation as napalm and phosphorous forbidden chemical weapons, they using all

Women and children from JINWAR call you to raise up your voices and take action against this war

Dear friends of JINWAR, We, the women and children from the free women’s village JINWAR in Northern Syria, write this letter to you, who were in contact with us or had the opportunity to visit us. During your time here you could get to know us, our village, and our daily life. You could see

How we Built Jinwar Women’s Village in Rojava/Northern Syria

The women of Jinwar wanted to run themselves based on democratic principles that respect everyone’s rights and assure everyone’s ability to participate in life as equals. Thus, the Jinwar debates about the women’s council of the village began. Every woman, who settles in the village can participate in the village council and help plan the village life. Jinwar women can collectively bake their bread in the bakery or cook and eat in the communal kitchen. At the school, the academy, or the health center, as well as in the realms of agriculture, media, and diplomacy, every woman can take up responsibilities based on her own wishes. She can shape social life, welcome visiting delegations, run the shop with her own products according to her own needs. She can get education and join discussions at the academy. She can discuss and share her views on woman and life, free co-life, women and ethics-aesthetics, women and ecology, women and economy, women and history, women and health/natural health. Women can of course arrange for their needs beyond the village as well, they go on family visits or invite and host their loved ones to the village. But men are not allowed to stay in the village overnight.