Amed / Diyarbakır / Tigranakert

Diyarbakır (Syriac: ܐܡܝܕܐ‎, translit. Amida, Kurdish: AmedArmenian: Տիգրանակերտ, Tigranakert) is one of the largest cities in North Kurdistan / southeastern Turkey / Western Armenia. It is considered the unofficial capital of Turkish Kurdistan, and has been a focal point for conflict between the Turkish State and the PKK.

The region has been inhabited by humans since the Stone Age, and has formed part of many empires.

Historically, Diyarbakır produced wheat and sesame. They would preserve the wheat in warehouses, with coverings of straw and twigs from licorice trees. This system would allow the wheat to be preserved for up to ten years. In the late 19th and early 20th century, Diyarbakır exported raisins, almonds, and apricots to Europe. Angora goats were raised, and wool and mohair was exported from Diyarbakır. Merchants would also come from Egypt, Istanbul, and Syria, to purchase goats and sheep. Honey was also produced, but not so much exported, but used by locals. Sericulture was observed in the area, too.

Prior to World War I, Diyarbakır had an active copper industry, with six mines. Three were active, with two being owned by locals and the third being owned by the government. Tenorite was the primary type of copper mined. It was mined by hand by Kurds. A large portion of the ore was exported to England. The region also produced iron, gypsum, coal, chalk, lime, jet, and quartz, but primarily for local use.

Situated on the banks of the Tigris River, Amed has a population of about 930,000. The city is about 76% Kurdish speaking.

 

 

Collective work from women of Amed to make red pepper paste

Preparation for winter of women in Amed continues. The women have worked collectively to make red pepper and tomato paste for winter.

‘A systematic programme to end agricultural production in Kurdistan’

Agricultural workers in the Kurdish-majority provinces of Turkey face obstacles in trying to reach water sources. This problem has been described as part of the government's intentional "systematic policy" by some experts.

Female sellers fined for refusing male sellers to work in all-women district market in Amed

Female sellers have been fined by the appointed mayor of Amed’s Bağlar Municipality for refusing male sellers to work in “Jiyan District Market”, all-women district market.

The Only Female Baker in Hani

Adalet Narin lives in the Hani district of Amed and she is the only female baker in the district. She makes bread and creates a social space for women in the district. She makes bread by giving shape the dough kneaded by women living in the district.

How Turkey’s Anti-Kurdish Crackdowns Threaten Women Across the Middle East

This article analyzes women’s political representation in Kurdish-majority regions of Turkey before and after the 2019 crackdown on elected mayors from the People’s Democratic Party (HDP), as well as women’s political representation in the Syrian region of Serekaniye (Ras al-Ain) before and after Turkey’s Operation Peace Spring.

Ecology in Times of War

In 2021, too, the war in Kurdistan has a great impact on the struggle for an ecological society there. So we need to take a closer look at how these two issues relate to each other and what an ecological stance can look like in times of war. To that end, Make Rojava Green Again conducted an interview with Kamuran Akın from Humboldt University in Berlin.

Economic Self-Governance in Democratic Autonomy: The Example of Bakur (Turkish Kurdistan)

This article aims to analyse the economic dimension of Democratic Autonomy, whose creation is projected to take place alongside politics, self-defence, diplomacy, culture, ecology and collective emancipation, and relates to the reader the arguments and experiences within the economic field.